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A Beginner’s Guide To Modes On The Guitar

Learn The Modes in a relaxed and fun way with YouTube blogger Chris Zoupa
Instructor:
Chris Zoupa
516 students enrolled
English [Auto-generated]
Play all 7 modes to 1 octave on the guitar.
Play 3 note per string diatonic shapes across the fretboard that will be useable in all keys.
Understand how to play and compose chord progressions in a chosen mode.
Understand what scales, shapes and arpeggios are suitable to use in specific keys and modes for composition and improvisation.

Modes have often been “scary” subject matter for many of my students over the years. This is mostly attributed to it repeatedly being taught in a theoretical manner with little application and context. This can leave students and would be learners stumped, intimidated and often unmotivated.

My course is all about creating an understanding of “hearing” the mode and the “mood” that is created when you hear it. It may even help you with the kinds of moods you are trying to convey in your compositions.

In this course we’ll cover the 7 modes as 1 octave scales, to covering the whole fretboard, as well as creating lead licks and understanding modal chord progressions.

A Beginner's Guide To Modes

1
Introduction Ionian & Aeolian

The best way to start your modal learning journey is to have an understanding of the Ionian mode (commonly referred to as "Major") and the Aeolian mode (AKA "Natural Minor").

With an understanding of these 2 modes, the other 5 modes will make more sense, as we'll be putting the modes into families of major and minor. We'll also be comparing their characteristics and differences to one another.

Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian & Locrian Modes

1
Mode 2: Dorian

This brief introduction to Dorian will cover the learning the Dorian mode to 1 octave and learning about it's important characteristic note often referred to as the "raised", "sharp" (#) or "Dorian 6th".

2
Mode 3: The Phrygian Mode

This brief introduction to Phrygian will cover the learning the  Phrygian mode to 1 octave and learning about it's important characteristic note often referred to as the "diminished" or "flat" (b) 2nd.

3
Mode 4: The Lydian Mode

This brief introduction to Lydian will cover the learning the Lydian mode to 1 octave and learning about it's important characteristic note often referred to as the "raised" or "sharp" (#) 4th.

4
Mode 5: The Mixolydian Mode

This brief introduction to Mixolydian will cover the learning the Mixolydian mode to 1 octave and learning about it's important characteristic note often referred to as the "dominant" or "flat" (b) 7th.

5
Mode 7: The Locrian Mode

This brief introduction to Locrian will cover the learning the Locrian mode to 1 octave and learning about it's 2 important characteristic notes, which are the b2 and the b5.

6
Learn the modes across the fretboard

This lesson will help you learn all 7 modes across the fretboard, as 3 note per string, 6 string scales spanning 18 notes, which are easily transferrable into any key.

We'll learn a simple formula which will help with what seems like a daunting task of having to memorise all 7 of the 18 note modal scales. 

Owning Your Ionian

1
Finding The Ionian Sound

In this lesson we’ll reiterate the Ionian mode to 1 octave and then compare it to the other Major modes that are Lydian and Mixolydian.

We’ll discuss the importance of the perfect 4th and the major 7th to create the overall happy and joyful sound that the Ionian mode is so well known for.

2
Ionian Diatonic chord structure

In this lesson we’re going to focus on the Diatonic Chord Structure, and how it relates to the Ionian mode. 

This will help you identify and compose Ionian sounding chord progressions, as well an understanding of the importance of the i chord.

3
Ionian Soloing Options

In this lesson we’re going to discuss how to solo in the Ionian mode.

We’ll focus on use of:

*3 note per string Ionian Diatonic scale shape

*Relative minor pentatonic usage

*Major triad arpeggios

4
Ionian Sample Licks

In this lesson we’re going to discuss how to use the Ionian soloing options we learned in a previous lecture and turn them into some licks to hear them in a musical and less robotic context.

Deciphering Dorian

1
Finding The Dorian Sound

In this lesson we’ll reiterate the Dorian mode to 1 octave and then compare it to the other Minor modes that are Aeolian and Phrygian.

We’ll discuss the importance of the raised or #6 that creates the interesting juxtaposing sound of Dorian as it has a minor sound with a hopeful sounding, major life that can be heard in Jazz, Blues, Rock and even RnB.

2
Dorian Diatonic Chord Structure

In this lesson we’re going to focus on the Diatonic Chord Structure, and how it relates to the Dorian mode. 

We’ll discuss finding the “Parent Key” of the mode we’re using, which will help us determine what chords we have at our disposal within the key signature we’re working with.

This will help you identify and compose Dorian sounding chord progressions, as well an understanding of the importance, highlighting and use of the ii chord.

3
Dorian Soloing Options

In this lesson we’re going to discuss how to solo in the Dorian mode.

We’ll focus on use of:

*3 note per string Dorian Diatonic scale shape

*Minor pentatonic usage with the additional #6 for Dorian flavour

*Minor triad arpeggios with added #6 as well as how to use a m7b5 arpeggio in a Dorian context

4
Dorian Sample Licks

In this lesson we’re going to discuss how to use the Dorian soloing options we learned in a previous lecture and turn them into some licks to hear them in a musical and less robotic context

Phabulous Phrygian

1
Finding The Phrygian Sound

In this lesson we’ll reiterate the Phrygian mode to 1 octave and then compare it to the other Minor modes that are Aeolian and Phrygian.

We’ll discuss the importance of the diminished or b2 that creates the sad minor sound, with the tense and evil “shark chasing sound” that we hear in the Phrygian mode that is repeated used in Nu Metal, Thrash and Flamenco.

2
Phrygian Diatonic Chord Structure

In this lesson we’re going to focus on the Diatonic Chord Structure, and how it relates to the Phrygian mode.

We’ll discuss finding the “Parent Key” of the mode we’re using, which will help us determine what chords we have at our disposal within the key signature we’re working with.

This will help you identify and compose Phrygian sounding chord progressions, as well an understanding of the importance, highlighting and use of the iii chord.

3
Phrygian Soloing Options

In this lesson we’re going to discuss how to solo in the Phrygian mode.

We’ll focus on use of:

*3 note per string Phrygian Diatonic scale shape

*Minor pentatonic usage with the additional b2 for Phrygian flavour

*Minor triad arpeggios with added b2 for Phrygian flavour

4
Phrygian Sample Licks

In this lesson we’re going to discuss how to use the Phrygian soloing options we learned in a previous lecture and turn them into some licks to hear them in a musical and less robotic context.

Luscious Lydian

1
Finding The Lydian Sound

In this lesson we’ll reiterate the Lydian mode to 1 octave and then compare it to the other Major modes that are Ionian and Mixolydian.

We’ll discuss the importance of the raised or #4 and also the major 7th that creates the dreamy, tense and spacey sound that the Lydian mode is well known for.

2
Lydian Diatonic Chord Structure

In this lesson we’re going to focus on the Diatonic Chord Structure, and how it relates to the Lydian mode. 

We’ll discuss finding the “Parent Key” of the mode we’re using, which will help us determine what chords we have at our disposal within the key signature we’re working with.

This will help you identify and compose Lydian sounding chord progressions, as well an understanding of the importance, highlighting and use of the iv chord.

3
Lydian Soloing Options

In this lesson we’re going to discuss how to solo in the Lydian mode.

We’ll focus on use of:

*3 note per string Lydian Diatonic scale shape

*Relative minor pentatonic usage

*Major triad arpeggios with added #4 for Lydian flavour

*Lydian Hirojoshi pentatonic 

4
Lydian Sample Licks

In this lesson we’re going to discuss how to use the Lydian soloing options we learned in a previous lecture and turn them into some licks to hear them in a musical and less robotic context.

The Magic Of Mixolydian

1
Finding The Mixolydian Sound

In this lesson we’ll reiterate the Mixolydian mode to 1 octave and then compare it to the other Major modes that are Ionian and Lydian.

We’ll discuss the importance of the dominant or b7 that creates the fist raising, stadium, GLAM rock sound as well as subtle Celtic influence that the Mixoydian mode is well known for.

2
Mixolydian Diatonic Chord Structure

In this lesson we’re going to focus on the Diatonic Chord Structure, and how it relates to the Mixolydian mode. 

We’ll discuss finding the “Parent Key” of the mode we’re using, which will help us determine what chords we have at our disposal within the key signature we’re working with.

This will help you identify and compose Mixolydian sounding chord progressions, as well an understanding of the importance, highlighting and use of the v chord.

3
Mixolydian Soloing Options

In this lesson we’re going to discuss how to solo in the Mixolydian mode.

We’ll focus on use of:

*3 note per string Mixolydian Diatonic scale shape

*Relative minor pentatonic usage

*Major dominant arpeggios

*Mixolydian/Dominant pentatonic scale

4
Mixolydian Sample Licks

In this lesson we’re going to discuss how to use the Mixolydian soloing options we learned in a previous lecture and turn them into some licks to hear them in a musical and less robotic context.

Astonishing Aeolian

1
Finding The Aeolian Sound

In this lesson we’ll reiterate the Aeolian mode to 1 octave and then compare it to the other Minor modes that are Dorian and Phrygian.

We’ll discuss the importance of the natural 2nd and the minor 6th that creates the sad, ballad, melancholy mode that Aeolian is well known for.

2
Aeolian Diatonic Chord Structure

In this lesson we’re going to focus on the Diatonic Chord Structure, and how it relates to the Aeolian mode. 

We’ll discuss finding the “Parent Key” of the mode we’re using, which will help us determine what chords we have at our disposal within the key signature we’re working with.

This will help you identify and compose Aeolian sounding chord progressions, as well an understanding of the importance, highlighting and use of the vi chord.

3
Aeolian Soloing Options

In this lesson we’re going to discuss how to solo in the Aeolian mode.

We’ll focus on use of:

*3 note per string Aeolian Diatonic scale shape

*Minor pentatonic usage

*Minor triad arpeggios

4
Aeolian Sample Licks

In this lesson we’re going to discuss how to use the Aeolian soloing options we learned in a previous lecture and turn them into some licks to hear them in a musical and less robotic context.

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