Hydrostatics – Study of fluid at rest.

Opposite of fluid mechanics - A fundamental approach
Instructor:
J Aatish Rao
English [Auto-generated]
Fundamentals of Hydrostatics - Study of fluid at rest.
Solved examples with neat explanation.
Concept of total pressure & center of pressure on an immersed surface.
Pressure diagrams.

The vice versa of fluid dynamics I say“…. Fluid statics or hydrostatics is the branch of fluid mechanics that studies “fluids at rest and the pressure in a fluid or exerted by a fluid on an immersed body”. It encompasses the study of the conditions under which fluids are at rest in stable equilibrium as opposed to fluid dynamics, the study of fluids in motion.

A advanced course suitable for mechanical engineering students & professionals who have the core knowledge of their field. This course is strictly NOT FOR BEGINNERS !!. You must possess the knowledge of certain concepts like pressure, atmospheric pressure, moment of inertia, parallel & perpendicular axis theorem, Center of gravity, Second moment of inertia, strength of materials etc. Most suitable for doing project works. In some universities, this particular topic is also a part of their curriculum.

Covered topics are enlisted below ;

  1. Introduction to pascals law.

  2. Pressure Head.

  3. Total Pressure.

  4. Center Of Pressure.

  5. Pressure Diagrams.

This course briefly covers the fundamentals of hydrostatics & that too with solved examples and neat explanations. Check out the free preview available & ENROLL.

HAPPY LEARNING !!

J.Aatish Rao

AutoDesk Certified User & Professional

Mechanical Engineering professional.

Introduction

1
What is HYDROSTATICS

The term ‘hydrostatics’ means the study of pressure exerted by liquids (such as water, oil etc.) at rest, on the container or any other surface immersed into it. In this course, we shall discuss about total pressure and its position (i.e. the point, where total pressure acts), Center of pressure and its position (i.e. the point, where center of pressure acts) on a surface. Also, Pressure diagrams for finding out the both will be also explained.

It has been observed that the direction of such a pressure (Discussed throughout the course) is always at right angles to the surface, on which it acts. In this course, only the study of water will be dealt with, unless specified, otherwise.

In this lecture, we are going to get the insights of hydrostatics & the core knowledge of a very important law - Pascal's Law. Please feel free to drop your questions & queries in the Q/A section after you ENROLL. Happy Learning !!

2
Pressure Head

Intensity of pressure is the force exerted by a liquid per unit area on a surface is called intensity of pressure which is generally termed as pressure. Basically intensity of pressure is nothing but the magnitude of pressure itself.

Total Pressure on a immersed surface

1
What is total pressure and its classifications in hydrostatics.

The total pressure on an immersed surface, exerted by the liquid, may be defined as the gross pressure acting on it. Mathematically, the total pressure may be found out by dividing the whole immersed surface into a number of small strips. The mathematical deduction & the types of total pressure is explained in this lecture with a solved example.

2
Total pressure on a horizontally immersed surface.

For explaining total pressure on a horizontally immersed surface, we have considered a rectangular slab as the test body. This lecture will comprise how to find out total pressure on a horizontally immersed surface with solved example & elaboration.

3
Total pressure on a vertically immersed surface.

For explaining total pressure on a vertically immersed surface, we have considered a elliptical disc as the test body. This lecture will comprise how to find out total pressure on a vertically immersed surface with solved example & elaboration.

4
Total pressure on a surface immersed inclined to the liquid surface.

For explaining total pressure on a inclined immersed surface, we have considered a elliptical disc as the test body. This lecture will comprise how to find out total pressure on a inclined immersed surface with solved example & elaboration.

Center of pressure on a immersed surface

1
Center of pressure on a vertically immersed surface.

The intensity of pressure, on an immersed surface, is not uniform; but increases with the depth. As the pressure is more over the lower portion of the figure, therefore resultant pressure, on an immersed surface, will act at some point, below the centre of gravity of the immersed surface and towards the lower edge of the figure. The point, through which this resultant pressure acts, is known as centre of pressure, and is always expressed in terms of depth from the liquid surface.

For explaining center of pressure on a vertically immersed surface, we have again considered an elliptical disc as the test body. This lecture will comprise how to find out center of pressure on a vertically immersed surface.

2
Center of pressure on a inclined immersed surface.

For explaining center of pressure on a inclined immersed surface, we have again considered an elliptical disc as the test body. This lecture will comprise how to find out center of pressure on a inclined immersed surface.

3
Center of pressure on composite sections.

For explaining center of pressure on a composite section, we have again considered an trapezoidal element as the test body. This lecture will comprise how to find out center of pressure on a composite section. Just for info purpose, The steps involved are specified below. The same is explained in the lecture itself with a solved example.

The centre of pressure of a composite section (i.e., a section with cut out hole or other composite section) is obtained as discussed below :

1. First of all, split up the composite section into convenient sections (i.e., rectangles, triangles or circles).

2. Calculate the total pressures, P1, P2 ..... on all the sections.

3. Now calculate the resultant pressure P on the whole section by the algebraic sum of the different pressures.

4. Then calculate the depths of centres of pressures h1, h2 ... for all the sections from the liquid surface,

5. Finally equate Ph = P1h1 + P2h2 + .....

where h = Depth of centre of pressure of the section from the liquid level.

Pressure Diagrams of vertically immersed surfaces

1
Introduction to pressure diagrams

A pressure diagram may be defined as a graphical representation of the variation in the intensity of pressure over a surface. Such diagrams are very useful for finding out the total pressure and the centre of pressure of a liquid on the vertical surface (i.e., wall or dam etc.). A vertical surface may be subjected to the following types of pressures :

1. Pressure due to one kind of liquid on one side,

2. Pressure due to one kind of liquid, over another, on one side, and

3. Pressure due to liquids on both the sides.

2
Solved examples with various cases.

This is the final lecture of this course. Solved examples pertaining to different cases for a vertically immersed surface is covered.

"I can't explain the gratitude I feel towards you when you are about to finish this course. I hope the hard work I put into this course reaches you in terms of vast knowledge & love".

Thank you so much once again for taking this course. :) .... Feel free to interact regarding any questions or queries you have in the Q/A section. Kindly provide a good rating if you liked the course.

HAPPY LEARNING !!

- J.Aatish Rao

AutoDesk Certified User & Professional.

Mechanical engineering professional.

You can view and review the lecture materials indefinitely, like an on-demand channel.
Definitely! If you have an internet connection, courses on Udemy are available on any device at any time. If you don't have an internet connection, some instructors also let their students download course lectures. That's up to the instructor though, so make sure you get on their good side!

Be the first to add a review.

Please, login to leave a review
da3dc73eca7bbf6fc2b1e764fd2bea81
30-Day Money-Back Guarantee

Includes

1 hours on-demand video
Full lifetime access
Access on mobile and TV
Certificate of Completion