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PMI-ACP Certification: Agile Project Management (Beginner)

Agile Certified Practitioner Certification Program (PMI-ACP) - Course 1 and 2 of 8 - Understanding and Adopting Agile
Instructor:
Sorin Dumitrascu
2,864 students enrolled
English
understand characteristics of agile project management, distinguish between primary and secondary agile values, recognize agile principles, recognize the differences between defined and empirical methodologies, and compare the agile triangle of constraints with that of traditional project management.
compare the phases of traditional project management with those of the agile framework , understand how a project manager's responsibilities will change on an agile project, and distinguish between common agile methodologies.
understand agile project management, determine whether your organization should adopt agile practices, and identify factors to consider when deciding whether to adopt agile practices.
apply key principles of agile practices, develop an agile mindset and obtain buy-in from stakeholders to implement agile practices, develop an agile mindset, and obtain buy-in from stakeholders to implement agile practices.

Welcome to the PMI-ACP Certification Agile Project Management for Beginners. This course includes the already popular course 1 and 2 of that will form the Agile Project Management – The PMI-ACP (Agile Certified Practitioner) Certification Program.

Course 1 of 8: The Agile Project Management Essentials

This is the first course of a series of eight that will form the Agile Project Management – The PMI-ACP (Agile Certified Practitioner) Certification Program.

Why Agile Project Management?

Agile projects are characterized by the use of short work iterations and incremental development of products, made possible by focusing on business priorities and customer value. The course provides an introduction to common agile methodologies, describes the relationship between defined and empirical processes, and highlights the key difference in regard to the triangle of constraints of agile versus traditional methods.

Guidance on how to take steps towards adopting an agile project management approach for those who currently use a traditional, plan-driven methodology is included. The relevant section discusses some common myths and misconceptions about agile development approaches, identifies factors to consider when deciding whether to adopt agile practices, and explains the general agile practices that a company may want to adopt. 

Who is your instructor?

My name is Sorin, and I will be your instructor. I am a trainer and project manager with more than 10 years of experience. Before Udemy, I trained hundreds of people in a classroom environment – civil servants, managers, project workers, aid workers and many more. And I managed projects in the fields of justice, corrections, regional development and human resources development.

How will you benefit?

And, this course is intended for project managers, program managers, or anyone who wants to efficiently participate in agile projects. It is aligned with the Agile Certified Practitioner exam objectives developed by the Project Management Institute® and Certified ScrumMaster learning objectives.

The course includes training videos, examples, exercices and quizes. And, if you take your time to go through all the learning materials this will entitle you to claim 5 PDU’s for the PMI certification exams and to maintain your PMI certification.

Course 2 of 8: Adopting an Agile Approach

This course provides guidance on how to take steps towards adopting an agile project management approach for those who currently use a traditional, plan-driven methodology.

It discusses some common myths and misconceptions about agile development approaches, identifies factors to consider when deciding whether to adopt agile practices, and explains the general agile practices that a company may want to adopt.

The Adopting an Agile Approach to Project Management Course provides project leaders with general guidelines on how to develop an agile way of thinking, one of the first steps in transitioning a team. The course also looks at some guidelines for obtaining buy-in from organizational stakeholders so they also embrace agile practices.

Adopting an Agile Approach to Project Management is intended for project managers, program managers, or anyone who wants to efficiently participate in projects that experience frequent change in the project requirements.

After completing this topic, you will be able to:

  • understand and correct common misconceptions about agile project management;
  • determine whether your organization should adopt agile practices;
  • identify factors to consider when deciding whether to adopt agile practices; and
  • recognize and apply the key principles of agile practices.
  • You will be also able to:
  • develop and champion an agile mindset; and
  • facilitate the buy-in of stakeholders in implementing agile practices.

The course duration is not more than 3 hours and you will have video lectures, written materials, quizzes, examples and exercises, to lear and practice, but also a small optional course project if you are interested in getting the most out of this course.

The course includes training videos, examples, exercices and quizes. And, if you take your time to go through all the learning materials this will entitle you to claim 5 PDU’s for the PMI certification exams and to maintain your PMI certification.

Thank you for considering my course. If you are interested, please register now. Or, just try some sample videos and make a decision after you have a better picture.

Introduction to the Section

1
Course Overview

If you have followed a traditional project management approach and find yourself spending a lot of time fine tuning the design to accommodate changing requirements, you may want to consider a different approach. In this course, you will be introduced to agile project management, including the core values and principles outlined by the Agile Manifesto.

2
Program Overview

This video will help you understand better the content of the other courses that will form this Agile Project Management - The PMI-ACP (Agile Certified Practitioner) Certification Program.

3
SECTION 1 - Agile Project Management Essentials

Just to be clear, because what I call section in the larger Certification Program, is a course by itself, let’s see what this course includes.

The Agile Project Management Essentials course will have two parts. And, the first one will be on what is called The Agile Approach.

4
Course Guidelines

You might know this. I’m adding it to any course in the introductory section. But, just in case some suggestions to improve your learning.

5
Introduction to the course

Understand structure, content and udemy for a better learning experience.

The Agile Approach

1
Defining Agile project management

This lesson will be very short and very clear. You are going to learn here what Agile project management means. This we can call the starting point, and with this we begin our course on Agile Project Management Essentials. And, please don’t expect more than the essentials in this course, the other courses that form the mentioned Certification Program will come with the rest of the information.

2
Agile characteristics

Agile project management has several key characteristics:

  • it relies on cross-functional teams that work in short iterations, and
  • uses an incremental approach to development;
  • it also focuses on business priorities and customer value, and
  • strives for continuous improvement.
3
Benefits of Agile management

Benefits of agile project management in relation to more traditional management approaches are that it can:

  • reduce risk,
  • speed up delivery,
  • generate more value, and
  • reduce the cost of making changes.
4
Primary and secondary Agile values

In 2001, representatives of different agile software development methodologies met to promote the development of the agile approach. They called themselves the Agile Alliance and drafted the Agile Manifesto which outlines basic values for agile development. In turn, these values are underpinned by specific principles.

The authors of the Agile Manifesto are Kent Beck, Mike Beedle, Arie van Bennekum, Alistair Cockburn, Ward Cunningham, Martin Fowler, James Grenning, Jim Highsmith, Andrew Hunt, Ron Jeffries, Jon Kern, Brian Marick, Robert C. Martin, Steve Mellor, Ken Schwaber, Jeff Sutherland, and Dave Thomas.

5
Agile principles

Twelve agile principles describe the four agile values in more detail. The first six principles are:

  • to focus on satisfying the customer
  • welcoming change
  • delivering working software frequently
  • ensuring that business people and developers work together
  • motivating the individuals involved in development, and
  • using face-to-face communication whenever possible
6
The evolution of Agile models

A development model is a guide to the development process, to help ensure that no important aspects of development are overlooked. Traditionally, development models were highly defined and linear. The trend now is toward more empirical models that include iterative and incremental processes, to provide greater flexibility.

7
Defined and empirical models

The waterfall (also known as traditional) model divides the development process into five phases:

  • Requirements
  • Design
  • Development
  • Testing
  • Deployment
8
The role of the project plan

Traditionally, a project plan is a document that helps project managers execute and control the phases of a project. It clarifies a project's objectives and how they can be achieved. Information included in a project plan typically includes the project's scope, cost, and schedule, as well as its activities, deliverables, milestones, and resources.

9
Inspection and adjustment

Highly defined and empirical development methods also differ in their approaches to product inspection, and to the adjustments required in response to customers' reviews of deliverables. Consider the differences between two teams that are developing a cell phone service, each using a different model.

10
The Agile triangle of constraints

The traditional iron triangle of constraints identifies three main types of constraints on the success of a project - scope, cost, and schedule. Change to any one of these constraints will affect the others. The quality of a project depends on satisfying all three constraints.

11
The Agile Approach

After completing this section, you will be able to: understand characteristics of agile project management, distinguish between primary and secondary agile values, recognize agile principles...

Agile Models and Methodologies

1
Traditional and Agile approaches

Based on the Agile Project Management model derived by Jim Highsmith, agile project management can be divided into five phases:

  • Envisioning
  • Speculating
  • Exploring
  • Adapting, and
  • Closing.
2
Traditional and Agile project phases

Like the agile approach, traditional project management can be described in terms of five key phases. These are:

  • Initiating,
  • Planning
  • Executing
  • Monitoring and Controlling, and
  • Closing.

Each of these differs in specific ways from the corresponding agile phase.

3
Agile project management

Agile development avoids the prescriptive, plan-oriented approach associated with traditional project management, and makes use of self-organizing teams. However, it is a common misconception that agile projects don't require project management.

Project management is still necessary. But, the traditional responsibilities of the project manager may be handled differently and possibly be spread out across members of the agile project team.

4
Scrum, XP, and Lean

You can implement agile project management using different methodologies. Although every agile methodology has different characteristics, they all maintain essential agile principles. Three widely used agile methodologies are:

  • Scrum
  • Extreme Programming - also known as XP, and
  • Lean development
5
Other Agile methodologies

Other agile methodologies include the Crystal family of methodologies, Feature Driven Development, or FDD, Dynamic Systems Development Method - or DSDM - as well as Adaptive Software Development - also known as ASD. The methodology you choose should depend on what will best suit a particular project.

6
Agile Models and Methodologies

After completing this section, you will be able to: compare the phases of traditional project management with those of the agile framework, understand how a project manager's responsibilities ...

PMI-ACP Certification: Agile Project Management Essentials

1
Section Project (Optional)

Section Project (Optional)

2
Agile Project Management Essentials

Congratulations! You finished the The Agile Project Management Essentials course!

After completing the first part of the course - called The Agile Approach -, you are now able to:

  • understand the characteristics of agile project management, and why is this important;
  • distinguish between primary and secondary agile values, and how this might help you in your work;
  • recognize and apply agile principles in your projects;
  • recognize and use the differences between defined and empirical methodologies; and
  • compare the agile triangle of constraints with that of traditional project management.
3
PMI-ACP Certification: Agile Project Management Essentials

Section wrap-up and conclusions.

Introduction to the Section

1
Course Overview

Wise project leaders are able to examine their own situations and determine which agile practices to adopt given the nature of their projects, organizations, and teams.

2
Program Overview

This video will help you understand better the content of the other courses that will form this Agile Project Management - The PMI-ACP (Agile Certified Practitioner) Certification Program.

3
Introduction to the Section

Learning, objectives, course content, course structure and course delivery.

Understanding Agile Project Management

1
Common Misconceptions about Agile

Organizations across the world are using agile project management to get superior results. But this doesn't mean that the move from traditional to agile project management will be easy. One of the main challenges is overcoming the various myths and misconceptions about what an agile approach involves.

2
Combining Traditional and Agile Models

The approach you adopt doesn't have to be purely agile or purely traditional. Instead of viewing different project management methodologies as black and white, you should view them as points along a continuum, with many shades of gray.

3
Agile Documentation

Agile development requires just enough documentation. Creating unnecessary documentation is considered a waste of valuable development time.

4
Applications for Agile

Although agile methodologies were first geared towards software development projects, they're not just development methodologies. Instead they're project management methodologies.

5
Agile Project Planning

Planning in Agile looks very different. In agile development, there's no work breakdown structure or time-phased and resource-assigned task list. Instead Agile uses just-in-time planning.

6
Agile Project Management

Various misconceptions about agile methodologies may prevent or hinder their adoption. Learn agile project management to apply it effectively.

7
Understanding Agile Project Management

Learn agile project management and correct common misconceptions.

When to Adopt Agile Practices

1
Factors to Consider

Using an agile methodology may have a tremendous impact on a project. It can shorten development cycles, improve quality and efficiency, lower costs, and result in better customer satisfaction.

2
Project Type

Some project types are more suitable for agile development than others. An agile approach is especially suitable when a project is characterized by a high level of internal uncertainty, a scope that isn't well- defined at the start of a project, and a product that benefits from ongoing customer feedback.

3
Organizational Structure and Culture

The structure of an organization is one of the key factors that determines how easily it will be able to transition into using an agile methodology.

4
Existing Processes and the Team

The nature of the existing project management processes in an organization will help determine how easily a team can adapt to using an agile methodology. Generally, the more flexible and informal these processes are, the easier a team will find the transition.

5
Industry and Customer

The nature of your organization's industry is an external factor that may affect the suitability of an agile approach. Industries that are relatively stable tend to focus on updating or improving products that have already been tried and tested. They have a steady customer base and know their product and competition.

6
Adopting Agile Practices

Which characteristics indicate that agile practices may be appropriate for this company and project?

7
When to Adopt Agile Practices

Determine whether your organization should adopt agile practices and identify factors to consider when deciding whether to adopt agile practices.

Agile Practices for Initial Adoption

1
General Agile Practices

It's not always appropriate to adopt a fully agile approach to project management. Organizations might not be ready to commit to the level of change and training that this requires.

2
Requirements Definition

Different agile methodologies use different techniques for defining requirements, and project teams may customize these to suit their needs.

3
Iterative Development

Another general agile practice you can adopt is iterative development with incremental delivery. Instead of completing all project work and then delivering the result to the customer for review, you focus on completing regular, short bursts of work and delivering the results to the customer at the end of each cycle.

4
Team and Customer Communication

A final agile practice that can benefit most organizations and projects is frequent, open communication among project team members, and between the team and the project customer.

5
Agile Practices for Initial Adoption

Recognize the key principles of agile practices.

Developing an Agile Mindset

1
Lean Principles

Agile methodologies don't generally prescribe exactly how you should manage a project. Instead they define principles that you can interpret and implement in your own way. By introducing these principles gradually into your workplace, you can transform the way your project teams operate.

2
Using Additional Agile Principles

Although lean principles can form the basis of an agile mindset and are generally easy to implement, they're not the only core principles used in an agile approach. Once you've introduced these principles and your team is familiar with them, you can begin introducing other agile principles.

3
Developing an Agile Mindset

Understand the principles behind an agile mindset.

Getting Stakeholders to Adopt Agile

1
Getting Buy-in from Stakeholders

An important step in the process of adopting agile practices is to obtain buy-in from stakeholders in your organization. Switching from a traditional approach to project management to an agile one involves making significant changes – and change can be difficult for people to accept.

2
Communicating the Need for Change

When communicating the need for change to stakeholders, you should focus on explaining the weaknesses of the traditional – or waterfall – model your organization currently uses.

3
Explaining Benefits

The next step in convincing others of the need to move from a traditional approach to a more agile one is to explain the potential benefits for the organization. When doing this, you can focus on three main benefits – reduced risk, improved control, and improved communications.

4
Agile Practices Statistics

Statistics that prove the effectiveness of Agile practices to review some statistics you can use when explaining the benefits of adopting an agile approach.

5
Explaining Risks

When you tell stakeholders about agile project management, you should be open about the risks or pitfalls involved. This gives the message that you're not trying to convince them to use agile practices, but that the organization's interests are a priority and that you want them to make an informed decision.

6
Getting Stakeholders to Adopt Agile

Obtain buy-in from stakeholders to implement agile practices.

Next Steps

1
Course Project (Optional)

A project covering the main steps in adopting agile project management.

2
Adopting Agile Management

Course wrap-up, learning objectives review and next steps.

3
Next Steps

Course project and conclusions.

Bonus - Agile Key Exam Concepts

1
Section Overview

This course covers the key exam concepts of Kanban, work in progress or WIP, lead time, cycle time, and Little's Law. You'll also learn about Agile Team Spaces, sharing the product vision, and identifying and reducing defects. 

2
Waste Types

In Lean project management waste, or the Japanese term Muda, is defined as any activity or process that doesn't add value to a product but does add cost. Lean's original Seven Forms of Waste include transportation, inventory, motion, waiting, overprocessing, overproduction, and defects. The new eighth form of waste is skills or non-utilized talent. 

3
The Kanban Pull System

In a Pull-based system, the customer demand creates what is called pull. Production or development relies on pull rather than on complicated market forecast to determine how many products to deliver.

4
Kanban Boards

A Kanban board is a tool that agile teams often use to visualize workflow through a system. While Kanban principles are often used in IT and software development, they can be helpful in any industry.

5
Determining Lead Time and Cycle Time

In lean project management, one of the key concepts is process improvement. Lead time and cycle time are two important metrics that help determine how lean a process is. In other words, how much of the time dedicated to creating a product is value added. 

6
Process Cycle Efficiency

Lean manufacturing is a management philosophy that focuses on reducing waste and implementing a flow-based production line rather than a batch and queue method. It's aimed at reducing costs and improving overall customer value. 

7
Little's Law

In order to maintain a stable process with minimal chaos organizations should attempt to minimize work in progress or WIP in their processes. One way to do this is by setting WIP limits. WIP limits help to reduce bottlenecks, improve the rate of throughput, and control the workload levels of project team members. 

8
Communicating the Product Vision

Stakeholder engagement is a fundamental part of project management. It's important to be able to express the product vision to stakeholders in order to gain support in common understanding about the product requirements. The product owner often collaborates with other key stakeholders to develop a product vision. 

9
Defining the Agile Team's Physical Space

With today's modern technology there are a variety of tools to bring teams together virtually. 

10
Exercise - Key Agile Exam concepts

Agile teams achieve efficiency by leveraging many of the tools from Lean Management, but also by valuing individuals and interactions. 

In this exercise, you'll demonstrate that you can identify characteristics of waste
recognize the relationship between PCE variables identify characteristics of Agile environments 

11
Agile Key Exam Concepts

This course covers the key exam concepts of Kanban, work in progress or WIP, lead time, cycle time, and Little's Law. You'll also learn about Agile Team Spaces, sharing the product vision, and identifying and reducing defects.

12
Agile Key Exam Concepts

This course covers the key exam concepts of Kanban, work in progress or WIP, lead time, cycle time, and Little's Law. You'll also learn about Agile Team Spaces, sharing the product vision, and identifying and reducing defects.

13
Bonus Lecture

More course at discounted prices

You can view and review the lecture materials indefinitely, like an on-demand channel.
Definitely! If you have an internet connection, courses on Udemy are available on any device at any time. If you don't have an internet connection, some instructors also let their students download course lectures. That's up to the instructor though, so make sure you get on their good side!
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